Becoming

Becoming

Book - 2018 | First edition.
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In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America, she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private. A deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations.
"An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States. When she was a little girl, Michelle Robinson's world was the South Side of Chicago, where she and her brother, Craig, shared a bedroom in their family's upstairs apartment and played catch in the park, and where her parents, Fraser and Marian Robinson, raised her to be outspoken and unafraid. But life soon look her much further afield, from the halls of Princeton, where she learned for the first time what if felt like to be the only black woman in a room, to the glassy office tower where she worked as a high-powered corporate lawyer--and where, one summer morning, a law student named Barack Obama appeared in her office and upended all her carefully made plans. Here, for the first time, Michelle Obama describes the early years of her marriage as she struggles to balance her work and family with her husband's fast-moving political career. She takes us inside their private debate over whether he should make a run for the presidency and her subsequent role as a popular but oft-criticized figure during his campaign. Narrating with grace, good humor, and uncommon candor, she provides a vivid, behind-the-scenes account of her family's history-making launch into the global limelight as well as their life inside the White House over eight momentous years--as she comes to know her country and her country comes to know her. [This book] takes us through modest Iowa kitchens and ballrooms at Buckingham Palace, through moments of heart-stopping grief and profound resilience, bringing us deep into the soul of a singular, groundbreaking figure in history as she strives to live authentically, marshaling her personal strength and voice in service of a set of higher ideals. In telling her story with honesty and boldness, she issues a challenge to the rest of us: Who are we and who do we want to become?"--Dust jacket.
Publisher: New York : Crown, [2018]
Edition: First edition.
Copyright Date: ©2018
ISBN: 9781524763138
1524763136
Branch Call Number: BIO OBAMA OBAMA
Characteristics: xiii, 426 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm

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r
red_eagle_579
Sep 17, 2019

Can we get this book in kindle format?

Thanks

sjpl_yourbestlife Aug 22, 2019

Starts out great and then...snore.

IndyPL_KimE Aug 19, 2019

Michelle Obama writes about what life was like as the former FLOTUS. It tells her story before Barack as a Southside Chicago child and teen navigating her race and community. It describes how she met Barack and their time in the white house as the first family of the Unites States. I know her as the former FLOTUS, but it was good to learn about her before politics, what her life was like growing up and the things that matter to her. I could not put this book down as she took me on the journey of her life and what she values.

l
lyndasclater
Aug 13, 2019

Amazing book! Book club: Sept/19.

She is a very engaging writer. It is fun looking into the background of how she became a lawyer and first lady after her humble beginnings.

i
iqraa
Aug 08, 2019

What an amazing read, really inspiring. You get a great look into Michelle's life as a young women and then after becoming the first lady. Its a great read, really recommend.

JCLBeckyC Aug 05, 2019

I highly recommend listening to the audiobook, narrated by Mrs. Obama herself. It's like having one of your girlfriends sit in your living room and talk to you in a relatable, funny, fascinating way.

p
patcarstensen
Jul 29, 2019

I'm inspired to try for her balance of un-illusioned but hopeful.

g
Gary Kines
Jul 28, 2019

When I put my name on the waiting list for this book I was in the three-hundreds. So I forgot about being on the list, but read book reviews, articles about Michelle Obama in magazines I like the writing and openness of, and read a couple of other literary biographies unrelated to U.S. politics. Now Michelle's autobiography, Becoming, is available for me to pick up.
But I've read so much about the book and its perspectives, as well as having been bombarded by Trump's negativity and racism, that I'm literally sick of the political crap and horror stories surfacing from the American political circus. I still admire the Obamas and their intelligent approaches to life, but I realize I don't care if I read her autobiography. I'm reading other things now: Middlemarch by George Elliot, travel humour by Bill Bryson, anthropology studies by Wade Davis, and the works of William Trevor. There's no room for anything rah-rah (cue the cry of a flying eagle) from south of the border and so, I'll be returning Becoming to the library, unread.

mazinwhistler Jul 21, 2019

What an inspiring read!!! I plowed through this book and was continuously moved (aka my eyes would be welling up!). Michelle's story is beautifully told - she is an engaging storyteller and a great writer. I lover her drive, her mind-growth set and her belief in the people and that change can happen...it just won't always happens quickly, sometimes taking years and maybe even decades. A worthwhile read and definitely not one to miss!

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Quotes

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c
cknightkc
Jun 23, 2019

“Failure is a feeling long before it becomes an actual result.” - p. 43

c
cknightkc
Jun 23, 2019

“Do we settle for the world as it is, or do we work for the world as it should be?” - p. 118

c
cknightkc
Jun 23, 2019

“For me, becoming isn’t about arriving somewhere or achieving a certain aim. I see it instead as forward motion, a means of evolving, a way to reach continuously toward a better self. The journey doesn’t end.” - p. 419

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

Many quotes in goodreads already, likely includes many below:

I’ve wanted to ask my detractors which part of that phrase matters to them the most — is it “angry” or “black” or “woman”?
===
Your story is what you have, what you will always have. It is something to own.
===
Everything that mattered was within a five-block radius — my grandparents and cousins, the church on the corner where we were not quite regulars at Sunday school, the gas station where my mother sometimes sent me to pick up a pack of Newport’s, and the liquor store, which also sold Wonder bread, penny candy, and gallons of milk.
===
Robbie and Terry were older. They grew up in a different era, with different concerns. They’d seen things our parents hadn’t — things that Craig and I, in our raucous childishness, couldn’t begin to guess.
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He was devoted to his car, a bronze - colored two - door Buick Electra 225, which he referred to with pride as “the Deuce and a Quarter.”

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

If you’d had a head start at home, you were rewarded for it at school, deemed “bright” or “gifted,” which in turn only compounded your confidence. The advantages aggregated quickly.
===
Kids found one another based not on the color of their skin but on who was outside and ready to play.
===
In 1950, fifteen years before my parents moved to South Shore, the neighborhood had been 96 percent white. By the time I’d leave for college in 1981, it would be about 96 percent black.
===
If my mother were somebody different, she might have done the polite thing and said, “Just go and do your best.” But she knew the difference. She knew the difference between whining and actual distress.
===

Their anger over it can manifest itself as unruliness. It’s hardly their fault. They aren’t “bad kids.” They’re just trying to survive bad circumstances

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

For the next nine years, knowing that I’d earned it, I made myself a fat peanut butter and jelly sandwich for breakfast each morning and consumed not a single egg.
===
My grandfather, born in 1912, was the grandson of slaves, the son of a millworker, and the oldest of what would be ten children in his family. A quick-witted and intelligent kid, he’d been nicknamed “the Professor” and set his sights early on the idea of someday going to college. But not only was he black and from a poor family, he also came of age during the Great Depression.
===
If you wanted to work as an electrician (or as a steelworker, carpenter, or plumber, for that matter) on any of the big job sites in Chicago, you needed a union card. And if you were black, the overwhelming odds were that you weren’t going …
===
Speaking a certain way — the “white” way, as some would have it — was perceived as a betrayal, as being uppity, as somehow denying our culture.

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

Failure is a feeling long before it becomes an actual result. It’s vulnerability that breeds with self-doubt and then is escalated, often deliberately, by fear.
===
I tore through the lessons, quietly keeping tabs on where I stood among my peers as we charted our progress from long division to pre-algebra, from writing single paragraphs to turning in full research papers. For me, it was like a game. And as with any game, like most any kid, I was happiest when I was ahead.
===
Advice, when she offered it, tended to be of the hard-boiled and pragmatic variety. “You don’t have to like your teacher,” she told me one day after I came home spewing complaints. “But that woman’s got the kind of math in her head that you need in yours. Focus on that and ignore the rest. ”
===
Her goal was to push us out into the world. “I’m not raising babies,” she’d tell us. “I’m raising adults.”
===
We weren’t going to “hang out” or “take a walk.” We were going to make out. And we were both all for it.

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

I was caught up in the lonely thrill of being a teenager now, convinced that the adults around me had never been there themselves.
===
Was she picturing herself on a tropical island somewhere? With a different kind of man, or in a different kind of house, or with a corner office instead of kids? I don’t know, and I suppose I could ask my mother, who is now in her eighties, but I don’t think it matters.
===

If you’ve never passed a winter in Chicago, let me describe it: You can live for a hundred straight days beneath an iron-gray sky that claps itself like a lid over the city. Frigid, biting winds blow in off the lake. Snow falls in dozens of ways, in heavy overnight dumps and daytime, sideways squalls, in demoralizing sloppy sleet and fairy-tale billows of fluff. There’s ice, usually, lots of it, that shellacs the sidewalks and windshields that then need to be scrapped.
===
I hadn’t needed to show her anything. I was only showing myself.

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

I hoped that someday my feelings for a man would knock me sideways, that I’d get swept into the upending, tsunami-like rush that seemed to power all the best love stories.
===
I’d been raised on the bedrock of football, basketball, and baseball, but it turned out that East Coast prep schoolers did more. Lacrosse was a thing. Field hockey was a thing. Squash, even, was a thing. For a kid from the South Side, it could be a little dizzying. “You row crew?” What does that even mean?
===
It was hardly a straight meritocracy. There were the athletes, for example. There were the legacy kids, whose fathers and grandfathers had been Tigers or whose families had funded the building of a dorm or a library.
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If in high school I’d felt as if I were representing my neighborhood, now at Princeton I was representing my race.

j
jimg2000
Feb 05, 2019

In my experience, you put a suit on any half-intelligent black man and white people tended to go bonkers.
===
To me, he was sort of like a unicorn — unusual to the point of seeming almost unreal.
===
Compared with my own lockstep march toward success, the direct arrow shot of my trajectory from Princeton to Harvard to my desk on the forty-seventh floor, Barack’s path was an improvisational zigzag through disparate worlds.
===
He was in law school, he explained, because grassroots organizing had shown him that meaningful societal change required not just the work of the people on the ground but stronger policies and governmental action as well.
===
There was no arguing with the fact that even with his challenged sense of style, Barack was a catch. He was good-looking, poised, and successful. He was athletic, interesting, and kind. What more could anyone want? I sailed into the bar, certain I was doing everyone a favor — him and all the ladies

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m
manish_pmp
Jul 16, 2019

manish_pmp thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

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